Thursday, March 26, 2009

First Place Winner--New York Book Show

Wordless Books: The Original Graphic Novels was awarded First Place Book in the Special Trade/ Adult Graphic Novel category in the 23rd Annual New York Book Show sponsored by the Bookbinders' Guild of New York. Mark Evanier's Kirby, King of Comics was the Second Place winner and Chip Kidd, Geoff Spear, and Saul Ferris's Bat-Manga! The Secret History of Batman in Japan won Third Place in the category. This festive event was held on March 24, 2009 in the Grand Ballroom at the Manhattan Center.

I was so honored to learn that my book was chosen a winner in this show. To learn on the night of the show that it was awarded the First Place Book in the Adult Graphic Novel category among so many other fine books was even more exciting. This award reflects the creativity with my publisher, Harry N. Abrams, and Robert McKee, book designer; Anet Sirna-Bruder, Production Coordinator; Michelle Ishay, Art Director; and Charlie Kochman, my editior. This award shows that the early wordless books and woodcut novels that I have studied for many years are finally being respected for a strong social message and admired for their visual impact.

Judges' Comments
"Three part 'torn' binding is very unusual and interesting. Typography is beautiful and appropriate. Layout and composition is very elegant. Tints are very even. Paper choices are excellent. Shows a great respect for the graphic novel genre."

The books have been selected from more than 900 entries from book publishers and printers, large and small, throughout North America, Europe, and Asia.

"For many of us," stated Eric I. Schwartz, President of The Bookbinders' Guild of New York, "including myself, the New York Book Show is the highest point of our seasonal calendar. Each year the New York Book Show is a demonstration of the care and creativity of the producers of great books, from the type on the page ,to the paper they are printed on, to the ideas they represent. It is an affirmation of the vitality of a technology first invented in the 1450s and a celebration of the multifarious permutations of the book within the community that has the greatest stake in its continued success."

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